What’s the Difference Between These Dental Professionals?

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_288954563.jpgYou may have noticed that some dentists have different letters at the end of their names. For example, Dr. Abelar’s title is "Martin P. Abelar, DDS." You may have also noticed other dentists who have the letters DMD at the end of their name. So, what’s the difference between DDS and DMD? And while we’re on the subject, what’s the difference between a dentist, periodontist, orthodontist and maxillofacial surgeon? Or between a dental hygienist and a dental assistant? Is one more qualified than the other? Here’s the lowdown on the differences in titles and abbreviations in dentistry.

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125 Hits

Could New App Help Patients Get After-Hours Dental Services?

b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_266568947.jpgAccording to a recent report by Daniel Wesley at CreditLoan.com, Americans work more hours than any other workers on Earth. In fact, Wesley claims that 66.5 percent of women and 85.8 percent of men work over 40 hours per week. That doesn’t leave a whole lot of free time - or time to see the dentist. But a new app created by former hedge fund analyst Eva Sadej could soon change that.

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437 Hits

Could Robots Replace Dentists?

b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_631377275.jpgFor some patients in the United States, getting to a dentist poses a real challenge. In fact, according to Pew Charitable Trusts, nearly 50 million Americans have limited access to a dentist due to living in an area with a dentist shortage. So, what can be done to help people get the oral health care they need until there are more dentists to serve these rural areas? A clinic in Xian, Shaanxi, China, may have a solution.

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793 Hits

Are Dental X-Rays Safe?

b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_245617978.jpgDental X-rays are both a useful source of oral health information and a controversial topic that many aren’t sure how to feel about. While they can literally give your dentist a much clearer picture of your overall oral health, they also come with a downside: radiation. In fact, just four bitewing X-rays expose the body to .005 millisieverts of radiation, which is the equivalent of the radiation exposure you’d get if you spent the day in the sun or took a short airplane flight. But while that may not seem like a lot of radiation to some, others are concerned that this exposure occurs so quickly, since most X-rays are done within minutes. So, what’s the bottom line with X-ray radiation exposure? Are X-rays safe, or should you skip them altogether?

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6796 Hits