• Aesthetic Dentistry - Martin P. Abelar DDS, San Diego, CA
    Aesthetic Dentistry - Martin P. Abelar DDS, San Diego, CA
    Aesthetic Dentistry - Martin P. Abelar DDS, San Diego, CA
    Aesthetic Dentistry - Martin P. Abelar DDS, San Diego, CA
    Aesthetic Dentistry - Martin P. Abelar DDS, San Diego, CA

Dr. Abelar's Blog

Posted by on in Dr. Abelar's Blog

b2ap3_thumbnail_sad-tooth.jpg In the dental world, teeth grinding is actually called bruxism. It affects around 30 million Americans, and the number is growing. The numbers are actually probably higher since many people aren’t even aware they’re doing it. This is because some people only grind their teeth during sleep.

There’s no one specific cause of bruxism, but for many, the likely culprits are stress and anxiety. It can also be caused by a misalignment of the jaw or by certain medications.

Since many patients aren’t aware they’re grinding their teeth, here are some symptoms to watch for:

  • Waking up with a headache or sore jaw and face
  • Difficulty opening the mouth all the way, especially in the morning
  • Damaged, broke or worn down teeth
  • Pain in the ears and jaw joint that is located just in front of the ears

b2ap3_thumbnail_swollen-gums-anim.jpg Chronic gum disease, also known as periodontitis, affects over 47% of Americans 30 years old and over. When the gum tissue that surrounds the teeth becomes infected, it can lead to major problems if left untreated.

Patients often admit to avoiding treatment for gum disease because of the discomfort associated with traditional periodontal surgery methods. In the past, gum surgery meant incisions, sutures and extended healing times.

b2ap3_thumbnail_girl-bubblepop.jpg People chew gum for a variety of reasons. Some do it to focus when they’re feeling anxious or stressed, others chew gum to freshen their breath or get rid of a bad taste in their mouth after eating. What if chewing gum not only freshened breath but also helped prevent decay?

A new study conducted by the Institute of Empirical Health Economics found that those who already chew gum could help save $4.1 billion on dental expenses worldwide by chewing just one extra piece of sugar-free gum each day. Even the American Dental Association says that after a meal, chewing sugar-free gum for 20 minutes can help prevent decay.

unicorn-ice-cream.jpgIt was hard to miss the impact Starbucks’ limited-time Unicorn Frappuccino had on social media over the last few weeks. Surprisingly, critics argued not so much over the taste of the beverage but about its sugar content. Mixed in with all the vividly colored pictures of people trying out the new highly-anticipated drink, were graphics detailing just how much sugar the sweet treat contained. One of the most shared claims was that it had the equivalent to up to 3 or 4 Snickers candy bars in just one drink.

So, how much sugar was really in it?

b2ap3_thumbnail_braces.jpg
The evolution of the internet has been an amazing thing for people who seek to learn new skills. Videos abound on every subject you can imagine. It’s never been easier to learn to repair a small problem with your car or fix a leaky faucet. Unfortunately, too much of a good thing can quickly turn bad.

A dangerous new trend has found its way around the internet in the form of Do-it-yourself dentistry. Video tutorials recorded by amateurs with no medical experience or education claim to teach people how to do everything from pull teeth to straighten them.

It may have become even more popular when the television show Extreme Cheapskates, which aired on TLC, featured an episode devoted to people too "cheap" to go to the dentist. In the segment, a woman needs her tooth pulled but doesn’t want to spend the $185 that the dentist quoted. So, she has her husband watch some videos online and perform the procedure himself.

Right Side - Smile Gallery

Be sure to visit our
Smile Gallery!

Right Side - Demand Force

Created and designed by Dog Star Media